OpenSuSE and Marathon

Working with Apache Mesos, it seems like something extra is always needed and unfortunately, the requirements are always…OpenSuSE friendly.

That’s okay though, we’ll get through this. There is a copy-and-paste solution at the bottom, so if you wanna skip down there, then go for it.

Marathon is a framework that runs on top of Mesos.

So, let’s install it!


git clone https://github.com/mesosphere/marathon
cd ./marathon
sbt assembly

What’s this?

sbt assembly
If 'sbt' is not a typo you can use command-not-found to lookup the package that contains it, like this:
cnf sbt

Well, poop….is it in the repos?


zypper se sbt

Nope.

Well, there are Red Hat repos, so, we’ll bum off of them:

zypper ar -r https://dl.bintray.com/sbt/rpm/ sbt
zypper in sbt

Once completed go back as your normal user and install it:

#sbt assembly
#cool, build instructions are incorrect. I've opened a bug: https://jira.mesosphere.com/projects/MARATHON/issues/MARATHON-7269
sbt packageRpmSystemd

And still an issue…okay:


[warn] three warnings found
[error] javac: invalid source release: 1.8
[error] (marathon/compile:compileIncremental) javac returned nonzero exit code
[error] Total time: 123 s, completed Apr 25, 2017 1:13:42 PM

Just install javac 1.8:


zypper in java-1_8_0-openjdk-devel

Build it and install it with zypper\rpm (just break the dependencies if you already have java 1.8 installed).

Okay, now let’s try to run marathon:


marathon --master local --zk zk://localhost:2181/marathon

And…no zookeeper. That is just an easy jar to download and install:


wget http://www.trieuvan.com/apache/zookeeper/current/zookeeper-3.4.10.tar.gz
tar -xf zookeeper-3.4.10.tar.gz
cd zookeeper-3.4.10
cp ./conf/zoo_sample.cfg ./conf/zoo.cfg
./bin/zkServer.sh start

With everything in place, you should be able to navigate to: http://localhost:8080 and be able to start some work.

If you’re getting permission errors, then check them (or just run everything as root, because no one cares about security).

Copy and paste version:

As root:

zypper ar -r https://dl.bintray.com/sbt/rpm/ sbt_repo
zypper in java-1_8_0-openjdk java-1_8_0-openjdk-devel sbt

As user:

git clone https://github.com/mesosphere/marathon
cd ./marathon
sbt packageRpmSystemd

cd ../
wget http://www.trieuvan.com/apache/zookeeper/current/zookeeper-3.4.10.tar.gz
tar -xf zookeeper-3.4.10.tar.gz
cd zookeeper-3.4.10
cp ./conf/zoo_sample.cfg ./conf/zoo.cfg
./bin/zkServer.sh start

As root:

zypper in systemd-marathon-1.5.020170425git7473886-1.noarch.rpm #Because of the above, we can safely break dependencies.
marathon --master local --zk zk://localhost:2181/marathon

Here is the rpm if you can’t be bothered to build it yourself.

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Freedom of Speech and Hate Speech


Every so often day, we get politicians who try to be pious and claim to be omnipotent and know everything about US Law. This is a regular occurrence and we generally laugh at the foolishness of our leaders.

So today, I’m going to feature former DNC chair Dr. Howard Dean:

Now, this is in regards to what Ms. Ann Coulter said about Timothy McVeigh in 2002:

My only regret with Timothy McVeigh is he did not go to the New York Times Building.

Now, there is nothing redeeming about that statement. She later backpedaled and added:

…RE: McVeigh quote. Of course I regret it. I should have added, “after everyone had left the building except the editors and reporters.”

The first amendment, which entails the freedom of speech says:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

The Supreme Court has ruled on this several times. Notably R. A. V. v. St. Paul
505 U.S. 377 (1992)
:

The reason why fighting words are categorically excluded from the protection of the First Amendment is not that their content communicates any particular idea, but that their content embodies a particularly intolerable (and socially unnecessary) mode of expressing whatever idea the speaker wishes to convey

And then later in Snider v. Phelps

speech deals with matters of public concern when it can ‘be fairly considered as relating to any matter of political, social, or other concern to the community’ or when it ‘is a subject of general interest and of value and concern to the public.

and my opinions from that time still stand

Although I do not agree with their message, they are given the right to protest under the constitution. This is by no means an endorsement of their actions, but they should be given the same right as every other American. That right being their ability to express their ideas, regardless if it is popular or not.

So, then why do so many people think that “hate speech” is not protected? Well, it goes back to what was mentioned in R.A.V. v St. Paul: “fighting words”.

Currently, the following are not considered protected:

  1. obscenity
  2. child pornography
  3. speech that constitutes so-called “fighting words” or “true” threats.

So, where does hate speech follow under? At best, we could make an argument in regards to “fighting words” or “obscenity”. Suppose I say a racial epitaph and that really upsets someone. Now suppose that person decides to start a fight with me. In that case, despite it being hate speech, it would not be protected, because it contains an obscenity even if I didn’t directly target or threaten that individual.

So Ms. Coulter made have expressed “hate speech” (and in poor taste), but it is protected since it doesn’t violate the aforementioned rules.

There are some other restrictions that can be put on speech, but those need to meet different guidelines (Time, Place, and Manner Restrictions, if it satisfies the highest level of scrutiny the Court can apply, and so on); however, those are outside of the scope of this particular post.

In the mean times, I strongly recommend checking out the source listed for the unprotected forms of speech. It can help clear up a lot of aire for both sides.

Dean Tweet Archive

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Quickie on Steam

So, I know I’m late to the party, but Yooka Laylee has been released and I got it through kickstarter (after @JonTron mentioned it).

I really enjoyed Banjo-Kazooie and its sequel for the N64. I know there are bigger fans out there, so I won’t pretend I’m know all about everything; however, they were good games. So playing a new game by the same team sounds like fun.

Now, this isn’t just a post singing the praises on Yooka Laylee (I haven’t even played it yet!), but instead how to get steam set up on OpenSuSE.

There is a repo that contains it (although I’ve been told that steam regularly breaks under OpenSuSE Tumbleweed), so let’s go and add it!


zypper ar -r http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/games:/tools/openSUSE_Leap_42.2/games:tools.repo
zypper in steam

Now, you may need to adjust the repo URI depending on your version, but that’s it! I used to use a .ymp file (aka 1-click install), but they are a pain in the butt sometimes, so just go through the two steps as root in the command line.

Once you have it installed, you’re good to go.

Have a lot of fun!

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Quickie on Docker

For those of you who don’t know, Docker is a way to have isolated applications that are able to be sent to various OS while being agnostic of that OS.

It has the advantage of chroot in that chroot is bound to a local machine.

This is a great oppertunity for me, because for each individual application, I tend to create a whole new VM. This is very wasteful, because I’ll have seven instances of CentOS and the software is 99% the same, but they don’t share any of that data so I’m just burning disk space on my ZFS server.

I did this isolation so that should one server be compromised then my entire network isn’t hosed. The idea of isolation is still something that we’re going to go with, but I don’t want to waste extra disk space.

For openSuSE, the install is very simple:


zypper in docker docker-compose docker-test yast2-docker
#Start and make sure that process always runs.
systemctl enable docker
systemctl start docker

Note, that I’ve added some extra stuff that should make things easy for beginners 😉

Now, as root, let’s make sure everything is good:


docker run hello-world

And everything should work!


Unable to find image 'hello-world:latest' locally
latest: Pulling from library/hello-world
78445dd45222: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:c5515758d4c5e1e838e9cd307f6c6a0d620b5e07e6f927b07d05f6d12a1ac8d7
Status: Downloaded newer image for hello-world:latest

Hello from Docker!
This message shows that your installation appears to be working correctly.

To generate this message, Docker took the following steps:
1. The Docker client contacted the Docker daemon.
2. The Docker daemon pulled the "hello-world" image from the Docker Hub.
3. The Docker daemon created a new container from that image which runs the
executable that produces the output you are currently reading.
4. The Docker daemon streamed that output to the Docker client, which sent it
to your terminal.

To try something more ambitious, you can run an Ubuntu container with:
$ docker run -it ubuntu bash

Share images, automate workflows, and more with a free Docker ID:
https://cloud.docker.com/

For more examples and ideas, visit:
https://docs.docker.com/engine/userguide/

This is cool and all, but logging yourself in as root (or sudoing) is always the safest idea just to run a program. To remedy this:


usermod -aG docker $USER #substitute for your username here

Log out and back in (or from your user terminal just run su – $USER)

To build my own custom image, I’ll need some sort of base system. From Docker documentation , it looks like it’ll work just fine with chroot base systems (this is great if you’re converting from a chroot to Docker)!

Because I use OpenSuSE and there isn’t an official boot strap (but there is one for Debian in the repos oddly enough), we should build our own chroot and then convert it over.

I found this handy guide on creating a OpenSuSE chroot.

So, let’s just get right into it! As root:

mkdir -p /chroot/opensuse-42.2
zypper --root /chroot/opensuse42.2 ar http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/42.2/repo/oss/ repo-oss
#Note, I got the above by doing zypper lr -u and grabbing the URI from there so if you're using a new repo you can get the right data
mkdir -p /chroot/opensuse-42.2/dev
cp -av /dev/zero /chroot/opensuse-42.2/dev/
zypper --root /chroot/opensuse-42.2/ install rpm zypper wget vim
#At this point, you can chroot into it and make some tweaks (chroot /chroot/opensuse42.2)
#Once you're done, we'll tar it up and send it to docker!
cd /chroot
tar -C opensuse-42.2 -c . | docker import - opensuse42.2
docker run opensuse-42.2 cat /etc/*release

And there you have it! If I need to make any major updates then I’ll link back and forth, but this should be enough of a start to get you going.

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Installing Apache Mesos on OpenSuSE 42.2

I want to try playing around with Apache Mesos and the getting started guide includes stuff for CentOS. I’m okay with CentOS, but I prefer openSuSE.

However, my default install didn’t have everything I needed so for the most part taking care of pre-reqs isn’t too bad so:


zypper in python-devel python-virtualenv subversion-devel java-1_7_0-openjdk-devel zlib-devel libcurl-devel openssl-devel cyrus-sasl-devel cyrus-sasl-md5 libapr1-devel libapr-util1-devel

Cool, but we’re missing one big thing: Apache Maven

This isn’t in the normal default OpenSuSE repos. So that leaves us with two options:

  1. Install from source
  2. Find a repo

Installing from source is easy enough, but I don’t wanna do that. I’m too lazy, so let’s go hunting for a repo!

The first link that comes up when searching is garbage, so don’t waste your time.

A little later on, we have a very promising link and this is what we want!

Now, you can do the “One Click Install”, but I find it too slow with using a GUI. If you’re a beginner, then go for it. Otherwise, as root, do the following:


zypper addrepo -r http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/devel:tools:building/openSUSE_Leap_42.2/devel:tools:building.repo
zypper refresh
zypper install maven

Now, I’ve added the -r flag because by default, adding a repo doesn’t automatically enable it to be refreshed. This could cause problems later on. So this way we’re good and if there’s an update, we’ll pick it up.

Once all of that is done, then just follow Mesos documentation for POSIX. As a rule of thumb, I use make -j 2 * num_cpu when compiling.

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Update on Hacking the Amazon Dash Button Rev 02

A short time ago I mentioned trying to hack the Amazon Dash Button.

Well, despite looking at the data sheet for the Atmel ATSAMG55J19A-MU , all of the pins are not listed!?

From the earlier post, it looks like pin 3 is the “magic bullet” to erase, but I want better documentation. If anyone has any ideas, then I’d like to know!

Posted in Engineering | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Hacking my server

So anyone who runs a server knows that there will be hacking attempts.

Most of the time I just ignore them as I have some defenses to stop primitive and bot hacks.

Just for fun though, I decided to do something about a hacking attempt.

Here is part of a log file:

199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:09 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:10 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:10 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:10 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:11 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:11 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:11 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:12 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:12 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:12 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:13 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:13 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:13 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:15 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:15 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:17 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:17 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:17 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:17 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:18 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:18 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:18 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:19 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"
199.15.233.142 - - [10/Apr/2017:06:24:20 -0500] "POST /wp-login.php HTTP/1.1" 200 3277 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:18.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/18.0"

As you can see, 199.15.233.142 tried a lot to guess my username and password. We also know that they are running a 64-bit version of Windows 7 and Firefox 18.

Luckily, it appears that they were unsuccessful! Now to figure out who owns this IP. To do this, we can use whois. We’d run it with whois 199.15.233.142 and then look at the result as follows:


#
# ARIN WHOIS data and services are subject to the Terms of Use
# available at: https://www.arin.net/whois_tou.html
#
# If you see inaccuracies in the results, please report at
# https://www.arin.net/public/whoisinaccuracy/index.xhtml
#

#
# The following results may also be obtained via:
# https://whois.arin.net/rest/nets;q=199.15.233.142?showDetails=true&showARIN=false&showNonArinTopLevelNet=false&ext=netref2
#

# start

NetRange: 199.15.232.0 - 199.15.239.255
CIDR: 199.15.232.0/21
NetName: IPS
NetHandle: NET-199-15-232-0-1
Parent: NET199 (NET-199-0-0-0-0)
NetType: Direct Allocation
OriginAS:
Organization: IPStrada (IL-19)
RegDate: 2012-07-18
Updated: 2012-10-16
Ref: https://whois.arin.net/rest/net/NET-199-15-232-0-1

OrgName: IPStrada
OrgId: IL-19
Address: 515 Houston ST, STE 800
City: Fort Worth
StateProv: TX
PostalCode: 76102
Country: US
RegDate: 2011-07-06
Updated: 2012-09-20
Comment: http://www.ipstrada.net
Comment: Standard NOC hours are 9am to 9pm CST
Ref: https://whois.arin.net/rest/org/IL-19

OrgNOCHandle: NOC12088-ARIN
OrgNOCName: NOC
OrgNOCPhone: +1-352-537-8652
OrgNOCEmail: support@ipstrada.net
OrgNOCRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/NOC12088-ARIN

OrgTechHandle: TECHS117-ARIN
OrgTechName: Tech Support
OrgTechPhone: +1-817-255-4006
OrgTechEmail: info@ipstrada.net
OrgTechRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/TECHS117-ARIN

OrgAbuseHandle: ABUSE3088-ARIN
OrgAbuseName: Abuse Dept
OrgAbusePhone: +1-817-255-4050
OrgAbuseEmail: abuse1@ipstrada.net
OrgAbuseRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/ABUSE3088-ARIN

# end

# start

NetRange: 199.15.233.136 - 199.15.233.143
CIDR: 199.15.233.136/29
NetName: IPS
NetHandle: NET-199-15-233-136-1
Parent: IPS (NET-199-15-232-0-1)
NetType: Reassigned
OriginAS: AS18981
Customer: Justin Downing (C03368055)
RegDate: 2013-04-11
Updated: 2013-04-11
Comment: N/A
Ref: https://whois.arin.net/rest/net/NET-199-15-233-136-1

CustName: Justin Downing
Address: 515 Houston St,
Address: STE 300
City: Fort Worth
StateProv: TX
PostalCode: 76102
Country: US
RegDate: 2013-04-11
Updated: 2013-04-11
Ref: https://whois.arin.net/rest/customer/C03368055

OrgNOCHandle: NOC12088-ARIN
OrgNOCName: NOC
OrgNOCPhone: +1-352-537-8652
OrgNOCEmail: support@ipstrada.net
OrgNOCRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/NOC12088-ARIN

OrgTechHandle: TECHS117-ARIN
OrgTechName: Tech Support
OrgTechPhone: +1-817-255-4006
OrgTechEmail: info@ipstrada.net
OrgTechRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/TECHS117-ARIN

OrgAbuseHandle: ABUSE3088-ARIN
OrgAbuseName: Abuse Dept
OrgAbusePhone: +1-817-255-4050
OrgAbuseEmail: abuse1@ipstrada.net
OrgAbuseRef: https://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/ABUSE3088-ARIN

# end

#
# ARIN WHOIS data and services are subject to the Terms of Use
# available at: https://www.arin.net/whois_tou.html
#
# If you see inaccuracies in the results, please report at
# https://www.arin.net/public/whoisinaccuracy/index.xhtml
#

Aha! We know that this is IPStrada and (as required) we have an abuse e-mail.

So I just fired off a quick one and we'll see what happens. (hint: nothing)

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Portable Serial Console

I’ve thought of a fun project to try and work while waiting for my research team to get back to me: Create a portable serial console with the Arduino.

This shouldn’t be too hard. I mean it’s basically a FTDI FT232RL, ATMega328, and a character display.

What I want is to be able to take this console, plug it in to one of my machines and have dmesg be pumped out to it.

This means I’ll probably have to write a driver for it (which shouldn’t be too hard) and then figure out a way to trigger it.

Some problems I see are how to separate this FTDI device with an Arduino “Pro Mini” (aka those cheap things you get off of eBay). I’m sure others will come up later, but that’s the biggest one I see right now.

Wiring diagrams and code will be available once completed.

Posted in Engineering | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Cluster Scheduling

While I’m waiting for some more info from some of the satellite projects I’m working on, I thought I should go back some OS research (which is what I want to focus on).

I was told to look at Data Sharing or Resource Contention: Toward Performance Transparency on Multicore Systems.

There are some ideas that come to mind; however, some of the information in the paper appears to be “incorrect”, so I had someone else document the Completely Fair Scheduler for me. I haven’t gotten a chance to read it to prove or disprove some of the things in there, but at least I have it in my back pocket to look at later on.

I don’t want to say too much, in case someone tries to get the scoop on me 😉 but if something gets published, then I’ll be sure to share it on here and for everyone else to see. I’m very lucky in my field in that a lot (and I mean probably over 75%) of scholars freely put their papers online for others to read for free.

That said, if you are thinking of getting into research, I strongly suggest that you join ACM if you’re doing research for Computer Science and related fields.

Posted in Computer Science | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Southern States Ball 2016

This gallery contains 4 photos.

Woo-Hoo! I found my CF card from last year that I thought I lost! Here are some pics from Southern States

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